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Sherrif’s Department reaches out to Knox County’s youth

Knox County Sheriff’s Department continues to reach out to Knox County’s Children to educate them on the dangers of drug abuse, safety issues such as bullying and to promote a positive feeling of friendliness and trust toward police officers. Sheriff Smith is committed to providing sworn members of his department to partner with parents, school officials and community leaders to help equip Knox County students with the skills necessary to become productive citizens of the community through such presentations.The content you are trying to view is available only to subscribers. Please log-in or go to Register to subscribe today!

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Business leaders honored, candidates speak at Lincoln banquet

By Mark White

For the Mountain Advocate

All four candidates seeking the Republican nomination for governor in next month’s May Primary election had three things in common or that they could agree upon when they addressed the 77th Annual Fifth District Lincoln Day Banquet Saturday night.

The first was that Kentucky’s next governor should be a Republican, whichever of them is nominated. The second was that each of them wants to be that nominee. The third thing was that neither Matt Bevin, James Comer, Hal Heiner nor Will T. Scott could keep their remarks within the five minutes they were allotted to speak during the banquet, which was held at Corbin Technology Center.

Scott, who vowed to stay within the designated time constraints when he started his speech, didn’t but came the closest to doing so. Each candidate spoke starting in alphabetical order. Bevin speaks “I agree with Senator (Robert) Stivers that we have extraordinary opportunity before us in this race.

I would challenge each of you as individual voters and each of you as candidates to remember the motto that is on our state flag, ‘United We Stand. Divided We Fall.'” Bevin encouraged the audience to look at the differences between the candidates. Bevin called for dismantling of Kynect, the state healthcare exchange, and removing Common Core standards from education. He vowed to lead the charge on both issues. Bevin said that between him and running mate Jenean Hampton, they are Kentucky. ”

We are black. We are white. We are from the city. We are from the country. We both grew up in poverty. We both live the American Dream,” Bevin said. “We are both military officers, former active duty. We represent what it means to be Kentucky that is what we are bringing to this race.”

He stressed the only way Republicans can win the November General Election is to get Democratic voters to reach across the aisles and vote for them. Comer speaks Comer said he can remember when Republicans would struggle to come up with one candidate to run for governor, let alone four candidates. “I agree the winner of this primary on May 19 will be the next governor of the state of Kentucky. It is an exciting time to be a Republican,” Comer said. Comer called the Fifth District the “Capital of Republicanism in Kentucky.” Comer said he is running for governor for three reasons.

“What we need in this state is someone to unite this state. We need someone that can bring people together to pass a bold agenda,” Comer said. “I am running for governor because we have to improve the business climate of this state. “I am running for governor because I want to change the culture in Frankfort. I am running for governor because we have to have badly needed leadership in this state. If we want to pass a bold agenda through the General Assembly then it is going to take a strong leader.” Comer said that one of the reasons why incumbent Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear is so popular is because he has kicked the can down the road on every important issue that needs to be addressed by the next governor.

“We can do better in this state. I’ve seen state government and I’ve seen programs that work but I have seen many more programs that don’t work,” Comer noted. “We have to have somebody with a strong private sector background but also somebody that understands state government and the legislative process.”

Heiner speaks Heiner noted that during 60 of the last 68 years, Democratic gubernatorial administrations have lead Kentucky. “Where has it gotten us?” Heiner asked. He said a few weeks ago a poll listed Kentucky’s economy as 47th out of 50 states.

“Our governor in his State of the Commonwealth Address said, ‘We don’t need to apologize to anyone for where we are in Kentucky with our economy,'” Heiner said. “This Democratic administration may be satisfied but I am not. We are going to do something about it this November by beating Jack Conway and electing a Republican governor to take this state in a new direction.”

Heiner said one important question Republican voters should ask themselves is who is best able to take on Jack Conway, who is unopposed for the Democratic nomination for governor. “I’m anxious to take on Jack Conway after this primary,” Heiner added. Heiner stressed the need for education reform, to make Kentucky a more business friendly state and to continue to hold onto low electric rates due to coal.

He said Kentucky needs to lower its tax rate, like Ohio did recently. Heiner stressed the need for state regulatory reform. “Our revenue cabinet here in Kentucky is getting a reputation to playing ‘gotcha,'” he said. “Kentucky is becoming a risky place to do business that is the reason why our economy is growing at less than the rate for inflation.” Like some other states have done with success, such as Indiana and Michigan, Kentucky needs to take a chance and elect someone with a business background as governor, Heiner said.

Scott speaks “We all have one obligation. We have to give the good working people of Kentucky a Republican governor,” Scott said. “Republicans of the Fifth District I submit to you that it is time to for us to get down on our knees and start praying.” Scott said Kentucky needs to fix education and find a way to get the Bible back in school. “The first way we are going to do that is get the United States government out of the education system in the state of Kentucky,” Scott said.

“We have to fix the pension system. We have 346,000 families, who worry every night that we as Kentuckians won’t keep our promises and pay our debt. Well, Will T. will.” Scott said Kentucky needs to find a way to make things safe like they were in the 1950s and 1960s when you could leave your doors unlocked at night. Scott, a former Kentucky Supreme Court Justice, said that he has a plan to do that. “Our prisons work with mean people but they don’t work with addiction,” Scott said. “90 percent of the people we are housing now in prison are addicted.

Let me build you some great minimum-security systems with psychiatrists and psychologists and schools with real skills training and I will increase the recovery rate and we will be saving. We save them and we save ourselves and we save Kentucky.” Hall of fame inductions During Saturday’s banquet, the Fifth District Lincoln Club inducted five new members including: former Kentucky Supreme Court Chief Justice Joseph Lambert of Rockcastle County, Letcher County’s Don Childers, Pulaski County’s Ward Correll, Jackson County’s Gary Reece and Letcher County’s Regina Crawford Stivers. At the close of the banquet, Laurel Circuit Judge Tom Jenson swore in the 2016 Lincoln Club officers in attendance. Those officers include: President Jackie Steele, President-Elect Suzie Razmus, Secretary Shannon Rickett, Treasurer Jenny Mitchell and Sgt. at Arms Paul Caldwell.

KCHS Golf stand-out Ana Owens signs with Union College.

Front Row (L to R): Coach Kermit Coffee, Grandfather Don Owens, Ana Owens, Grandmother Judy Owens, Rachel Scalf holding Khloey Scalf. Back Row (L to R): KCHS Principal Timothy Melton, KCHS Head Golf Coach Leeann Mills, Union College Assistant Golf Coach Kayla Horn, Union College Head Golf Coach Anthony Carruba, KCHS Athletic Director Jeff Canady.

Front Row (L to R): Coach Kermit Coffee, Grandfather Don Owens, Ana Owens, Grandmother Judy Owens, Rachel Scalf holding Khloey Scalf.
Back Row (L to R): KCHS Principal Timothy Melton, KCHS Head Golf Coach Leeann Mills, Union College Assistant Golf Coach Kayla Horn, Union College Head Golf Coach Anthony Carruba, KCHS Athletic Director Jeff Canady.

Knox Central High School Senior Ana Owens recently signed with Union College to play golf for the 2015-16 season. Owens is a fifth year member of the Panthers Golf Team and set a Knox Central record by shooting a 36 during her junior year. Owens followed up her senior year by breaking her own record with a two under par 34 at Wasioto Winds in Pineville.
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Knox Middle Softball defeats Lynn Camp 25-3

Photos by Derrick Poff The Lady Panthers of Knox Middle defeated the Lynn Camp Middle Lady Wildcats this past Friday with a score of 25-3. The Lady Wildcats jumped out to a 1-0 lead in their half of the first, only to watch that lead slip when the Lady Tigers scored five in the bottom of the first. The Tigers held Lynn Camp scoreless in the second and then went on to score 20 runs of their own in the bottom of the second to lead 25-1. Lynn Camp scored 2 in the third inning but just could not overcome the deficit.

Photos by Derrick Poff
The Lady Panthers of Knox Middle defeated the Lynn Camp Middle Lady Wildcats this past Friday with a score of 25-3. The Lady Wildcats jumped out to a 1-0 lead in their half of the first, only to watch that lead slip when the Lady Tigers scored five in the bottom of the first. The Tigers held Lynn Camp scoreless in the second and then went on to score 20 runs of their own in the bottom of the second to lead 25-1. Lynn Camp scored 2 in the third inning but just could not overcome the deficit.

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Lynn Camp Softball splits double header with Bell

by Dennis Mills

Kourtnie Mills plays defense late in the second game of a double-header on Monday night against Bell County. Lynn Camp split the games, losing the first 4-8 but bouncing back with an 8-3 victory in the second contest. Rain forced a 30 minute delay in the second inning of the final game.

Kourtnie Mills plays defense late in the second game of a double-header on Monday night against Bell County. Lynn Camp split the games, losing the first 4-8 but bouncing back with an 8-3 victory in the second contest. Rain forced a 30 minute delay in the second inning of the final game.

The Lynn Camp Lady Wildcats Softball team was back on the field for the first time in two weeks on Monday night as they split a double-header with the Bell County Lady Bobcats.

Lynn Camp’s Destiny Hill steals second base in game one of a double-header against Bell County on Monday night. Hill had two RBI’s in the first game and an inside-the-park homerun in the second game.

Lynn Camp’s Destiny Hill steals second base in game one of a double-header against Bell County on Monday night. Hill had two RBI’s in the first game and an inside-the-park homerun in the second game.

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