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Sheriff’s Report

Knox County Sheriff Badge

Knox County Sheriff Mike Smith is reporting the following Enforcement Actions:

On August 17, 2015 Deputy Claude Hudson observed a vehicle run a stop sign on KY 3436 in Corbin, After stopping the vehicle Deputy Hudson arrested the driver, Jerry Wayne Caldwell age 42 of Corbin, KY charging him with Failure to stop at a Stop Sign Operating a Motor Vehicle Under the Influence of Drugs and No Insurance. Deputy Hudson also arrested the passenger, Ronnie Allen Taylor age 33 of Woodbine, KY charging him with Possession of Methamphetamine, Possession of Marijuana and Possession of Drug Paraphernalia. Both men were lodged in the Knox County Detention Center.

On August 18, 2015 Deputy Keith Liford arrested Shawn Dillingham age 43 of Bryant’s Store, KY on three Knox County Bench warrants for failure to appear on Flagrant Non-Support charges, and failure to pay fines on a Public Intoxication charge and several traffic related charges. He was lodged in the Knox County Detention Center.

On August 18, 2015 Knox County Court Security Officer William Hamilton executed an Knox County Bench warrant on Samuel Owens age 41 of Gray, KY for failure to appear on charges of Public Intoxication and Theft by Unlawful Taking or Disposition Under $500. He was lodged in the Knox County Detention Center.

On August 19, 2015 Deputy Jason Carmack was dispatched to Bill Sowders Lane to a residence where a female was asked to leave and would not leave. Deputy Carmack arrested Patricia Honeycutt age 53 of Flat Lick, KY for Alcohol Intoxication. She was lodged in the Knox County Detention Center.

On August 19, 2015 Deputy Claude Hudson investigated a report of a stolen firearm that had been pawned to another individual. Through the investigation the firearm was linked to Brian Klette. Deputy Hudson arrested Brian Klette age 26 of Artemus, KY charging him with Convicted Felon in Possession of a Firearm. He was lodged in the Knox County Detention Center.

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Knox Board welcomes new teachers

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Knox County Board of Education welcomed 25 new teachers to the team. Before the Wednesday, Aug. 25 meeting, new teachers from throughout the county were treated to a reception, and during the meeting were presented with a gift to show the board’s appreciation.

Other topics included:

  • The board agreed to keep real estate tax the same as last year at 50.4 percent. Dexter Smith, Chair of the board said, “With the average income for Knox Countians being as low as it is, I just don’t have the heart to raise it.”

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Released from Knox County Detention Center

Knox County Detention Center Barbourville, KY

Knox County Detention Center
Barbourville, KY

Released from Knox County Detention Center 8/28/15 (Friday)

Anthony L. Brinyark, William R. Crawford, Mark C. Daniels, Clifford R. Fischer, Jerry M. Hibbard, Allen Honeycutt, Clifford S. Louden, Carl S. Merida, Christopher Vandusen and Chirstopher S. West.

 

Released from Knox County Detention Center 8/29/15 (Saturday)

Donald L. Castle, George B. Jones, Nile A. Mitchell, Christie D. Smith and Tressia G. Sprinkles.

 

Released from Knox County Detention Center 8/30/15 (Sunday)

Tony Broughton.

New Union College students begin the college experience by serving community

More than 200 incoming Union College students spent a part of their first full weekend on campus “paying it forward” throughout the community.

Jodi Carroll, Director of the Center for Civic Engagement at Union College, said 230 students, mostly freshmen, participated in community service at 13 locations throughout the region Saturday. Community service is part of Union’s mission, but this is the first time a Service Day was planned to engage all incoming freshmen in outreach projects.

“In most cases our students were able to learn about the community and these organizations that serve our area,” Carroll said. “It is inspiring to know that so many of our students were familiar with service work and have had these experiences in their own communities. It is also great to think that maybe this project inspired those students who have never participated in service work to continue with the experience.”

Carroll arranged for students to participate in service activities around Barbourville, Knox County and the local region, primarily assisting organizations known for providing a helping hand to local citizens. Students worked at Clearfork Community Institute, Knox-Whitley Animal Shelter, Lend-A-Hand Center, Goodwill Industries, Redbird Mission, Barbourville Recycling Center, Henderson Settlement, Cumberland Falls State Park and Pine Mountain State Park. Work around Union’s campus was performed as well. Students picked up trash, sorted recyclable goods, landscaped, performed trail maintenance and made facility repairs at the various locations.

Barbourville Mayor David Thompson joined more than 20 students assisting at the Barbourville Recycling Center. Thompson said it was great seeing the students work to “pay it forward” in the community.

James Benge worked alongside the students at the recycling center. Benge is a sophomore at Union and participates in one of the college’s service driven organizations, Common Partners.

“It’s a good experience for Union’s freshmen to participate in volunteer work and give back to this community.” Benge said.

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Knox County Health Coalition organizes health assessment

“Every three years the local hospitals ask us for this information, this time we’re trying to get ahead of the game and already have it prepared for them.” explained Chairman Terry Lanham.
They plan to make the survey simple and to the point in order to get as much feed back from the community as possible.
“We need to be response driven,” said Vice-Chairman Russell Jones, “everything we do should be in response to this survey.”
The survey is expected to be ready around the beginning of October.
“We’re hoping to be ready by the Daniel Boone festival,” Said Lanham, “So, we can have a table set up there and get a broad range for feedback.”
If all goes according to plan, the survey will be distributed through local organizations and will possible be available online.

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