Governor candidate visits town

August 21, 2015
Brandon Jackson, of Barbourville, and his daughter Karlie, spoke with gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin after he addressed the community last Thursday.

Brandon Jackson, of Barbourville, and his daughter Karlie, spoke with gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin after he addressed the community last Thursday.

Bevin visits Barbourville for community forum, exclusive interview


“It’s really humbling to run for office,” gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin told those that came to hear him speak last Thursday at the courthouse.

Bevin grew up as the second of six children and says he is grateful to his parents instilling good ethics in him and his siblings.

“We were raised to give an honest day’s work for an honest day’s pay,” he said. “You should never take a dollar that you didn’t earn. And your word is your bond.”

Bevin said he is proud to be raised in a home with strong Christian values.

“I’m not looking to be anyone’s moral or spiritual leader, but I’m unapologetic about the fact that the very cornerstone of the way I was raised and the principals that make this nation great were instilled in me from the time I was young.

“We should be a better version of who we are,” said Bevin. And I’m tired of electing people who have never worked in the real world. I’m tired of seeing more and more money squeezed from fewer and fewer people, trying to cover more and more needs. We’ve got to find a way to get more people engaged and more people working so that we can less from more people. That how this nation was intended to be.”

Bevin said he doesn’t need or want the governor’s job badly enough to misrepresent himself or what he believes in.

At this point, Bevin opened the floor for questions from the community.

Below is a summary of the questions and Bevin’s answers:

Community: What can we do as a state to push back the overregulation, not only on the coal industry, but on the banking industry?

Bevin: Let’s face it. We’re broke. We have the second worst credit rating in America. We’re also the sixth least solvent state. The question is not what the government can do for Eastern Kentucky, but what the government can stop doing for Eastern Kentucky. President Obama is bypassing the rule of law, bypassing the legislature and the Congress and simply telling people this is how it’s going to be. That’s not acceptable to me. As a governor of this state, I will not comply. I’m a believer in living under the law, whether I believe in the law or not. But, if it is not a legally binding mandate, we don’t have to comply. We don’t need that kind of intrusion in this state.

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